False Magic Kingdom

False Magic Kingdom From Jordan Krall author of BEYOND THE VALLEY OF THE APOCALYPSE DONKEYS comes a novella in the tradition of early J G Ballard later William Burroughs and Barry Malzberg Exploring the concepts of p

  • Title: False Magic Kingdom
  • Author: Jordan Krall
  • ISBN: null
  • Page: 408
  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • From Jordan Krall, author of BEYOND THE VALLEY OF THE APOCALYPSE DONKEYS, comes a novella in the tradition of early J G Ballard, later William Burroughs, and Barry Malzberg Exploring the concepts of personal and public tragedy, this is a book unlike anything Krall has written before a collection of brief chapters in an infinite universe of physical and mental illness,From Jordan Krall, author of BEYOND THE VALLEY OF THE APOCALYPSE DONKEYS, comes a novella in the tradition of early J G Ballard, later William Burroughs, and Barry Malzberg Exploring the concepts of personal and public tragedy, this is a book unlike anything Krall has written before a collection of brief chapters in an infinite universe of physical and mental illness, urban destruction, and the cracks in society we fight to ignore.

    • [PDF] ✓ Free Download ↠ False Magic Kingdom : by Jordan Krall ↠
      408 Jordan Krall
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] ✓ Free Download ↠ False Magic Kingdom : by Jordan Krall ↠
      Posted by:Jordan Krall
      Published :2020-03-03T21:45:13+00:00

    813 Comment

    • Paige Ellen Stone says:

      I love irony. I love paradox. I love absurdity. False Magic Kingdom (and its sequel, Bad Alchemy, which I am now reading) is an exercise in all three. The author's note in the beginning of the book, that "This is my first attempt at non-genre fiction, I may have failed, I don't know, but this is a story I needed to tell."I find it ironic that JK describes this book as a non-genre story that he had to tell. From my perspective and in my opinion JK and a few others have created a genre known as "n [...]

    • Hakim says:

      Jordan Krall, one of the undisputed masters of modern weird fiction, delivers an unsettling and highly entrancing book - Book 1 of the False Kingdom trilogy- with emotional depth and intriguing characters. Once I got accustomed to the rather unusually shattered narrative and started putting together the pieces of the puzzle, I couldn't put the book down.

    • Sheldon says:

      “False Magic Kingdom” by Jordan Krall is a significant departure from Krall's previous work. It's also one of the hardest to provide a review for more than one reason.One can't really describe the book that well. It's a series of short chapters that take place from multiple viewpoints. These different stories have a very loose relation to each other. Some are hard to tell if they're related at all. We return to the different stories periodically as everything moves forward, and sort of cycle [...]

    • Donald Armfield says:

      From beginning with an "Argon Seizure" to the end "Fathers" Jordan Krall gives us thoughts and tears. " Unfruitful Works" gave me a tears, not literally but a very touching story.My favorite character is Jessica. She has two stories. A day dreamer wondering where her father went. I hope we see more of her in "Bad Alchemy"This is a great read I will be waiting with my glass of jet fuel and a cigarette for the next installment.

    • Byron'Giggsy' Paul says:

      shortly, this just didn't work for me, but in giving it 2 stars I feel I should at least mention the writing wasn't bad, it just didn't come together for my interests and will likely give another Krall title an attempt in the future

    • Steven Shroyer says:

      Nothing short of brilliant. Reminds me of all the Burroughs I read in college!

    • Justin says:

      FALSE MAGIC KINGDOM is quite the puzzling read. There is A LOT going on. Several individual stories are told coexisting seemingly in the timeline. Corporate servitude, unstable people and mental illness are the themes that bond the stories together.The characters are relatable as they tend to be people who are just sick of it all, tired and beaten by life. Many of the internal monologues seemed familiar in one way or another. It really delves into people's flaws, the ignorance of their own and y [...]

    • Jeremy Maddux says:

      Jordan Krall does with skyscrapers what Lovecraft did with tentacles, and it works. Why? Because isn't that what Americans are really afraid of these days? Think about it. It's an undisputed fact that the Cthulhu Mythos has penetrated the mainstream, with Call of Cthulhu card games, endless literary homages from modern horror authors, a Cthulhu plushie for God's sake! But what makes us weak at the knees isn't the Elder Gods or the Old Ones or Sumerian incantations. It's tall buildings and their [...]

    • R.A. Harris says:

      A strange tale of multiple vantage points that seem to coalesce into one bizarre view point. Recurring themes of buildings collapsing/demolition, government conspiracy, buildings coming alive, suicide all paint a sad lonely world. It gets meta-fictional towards the end, with reference to previous lines being parts of stories within the story, and the storyline being lifted from films within the story. All very strange, evocative and sad. The language Krall uses in this book is sometimes really s [...]

    • Db123 says:

      I loved the style of writing. I've always loved surrealism and the writings of William S Burroughs, both of which I would bet this draws influence from. The author also has a keen sense for figurative language.However, beyond Burroughs, themes of bitterness and misanthropy tend to bore me. If that's your thing then you might love this book. The tone the author takes also seems to be more than a little pretentious at times. But perhaps this is intentional, meant to be ironic. I couldn't tell.

    • Luke says:

      Really unusual book. I've never read anything by Jordan Krall before, but I understand this is very different from his other work. Probably something that requires multiple readings to really wrap your head around. It's hard to imagine this book having a sequel because it's not really a single narrative, but apparently it does, and I'll definitely read that as well.

    • Nick Cato says:

      Simply brilliant.

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *