The Metaphysical Poets

The Metaphysical Poets In this important and influential anthology Dame Helen Gardner has collected together those seventeenth century poets who although never self consciously a school did possess in common certain featu

  • Title: The Metaphysical Poets
  • Author: Helen Louise Gardner
  • ISBN: 9780140420388
  • Page: 399
  • Format: Paperback
  • In this important and influential anthology Dame Helen Gardner has collected together those seventeenth century poets who, although never self consciously a school, did possess in common certain features of argument and powerful persuasion which have come to be described as metaphysical Contains amongst others John Milton, Thomas Carew, Sir William Davenant, Henry VaugIn this important and influential anthology Dame Helen Gardner has collected together those seventeenth century poets who, although never self consciously a school, did possess in common certain features of argument and powerful persuasion which have come to be described as metaphysical Contains amongst others John Milton, Thomas Carew, Sir William Davenant, Henry Vaughan, Andrew Marvell, George Herbert, Sir Walter Ralegh, Robert Southwell, John Donne and Richard Crashaw.

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      Published :2019-09-27T23:38:47+00:00

    817 Comment

    • Steve says:

      Actually, I've already read this. But a good poetry anthology is gold, and worth returning to again and again (as I'm doing now). Gardner did a great job with the selections. Donne, Herbert, Vaughn, but also poets that have been long forgotten.

    • Hannah says:

      This is a book I will always be currently reading. Metaphysical poetry is my JAM!!! If you aren't familiar with the genre, they use very obscure and surprising metaphors to explore/portray/express/invoke feelings of love and ecstasy (both secular and religious), metaphors that are at first confusing and random, but metaphors that the minute you 'get' them will appear to you as so goddamn perfect that you can't believe it. There are more academic words for this type of metonymy, they are referred [...]

    • M says:

      As expected, nobody can outshine Donne at this game. But some fascinating other bits, from Henry Vaughan to Abraham Cowley to John Hall to of course Marvell, who was really far better the less pious he was, to the little tastes of amateur authors who only did a few poems for their own entertainment, as so many of these Metaphysicals were. Also a lovely way to encounter bits of Milton in another context and to have a truly wonderful setting for Shakespeare's "Phoenix and the Turtle."But as for th [...]

    • Stef Rozitis says:

      I realise this will make me sound like a Philistine (and me with an English major in Arts) but I don't understand why time has dignified these poets who are usually blessedly unclear but when you decode them they are downright offensive!The most massivley over-rated John Dunne is there for far too many pages, not only with his rape fantasies (of God raping him, because God is above man as man is above woman of course) but just as much misogyny in his love life as his religious like.I didn't feel [...]

    • Douglas Dalrymple says:

      Gardner's selection is terrific and her introduction is too. I'd read a lot of this stuff years ago in college, of course, but it was nice to revisit it. Donne is fine and all, but let's hear it for George Herbert and Thomas Traherne. The latter's prose isn't included here but it's worth the time and at least as poetic as anything contained in this volume.

    • Daniel Petra says:

      They are the ones who have shown us the right path to practical and truly beneficial spirituality!

    • Andrew Gills says:

      I love poetry and this delightful collection has entertained me. I am glad the editor / compiler didn't include the longer poems though because it meant I could just pick up the book, flip to a poem and read it between other things I was doing. Some of the poems are quite challenging (both in language and meaning) but that was the intent of many of the poets included in the compilation. I think they didn't want poetry to be available to the masses - but rather to the educated classes. I recommen [...]

    • Carole says:

      The first book of poetry I have ever read. Actually, I cheated a bit and skipped over a lot of the poems.The three stars is for overall impression but some of the religious poems are really breath-taking. Worth the price of the book just for those poems.

    • Nickwill2001 says:

      a collection of 16th to 18th century English Metaphysical Poets. I return to it often.

    • Lysergius says:

      A goodly selection of the best of the metaphysical Poets. An excellent introduction to these poetical mind benders

    • Mieczyslaw Kasprzyk says:

      "Go catch a falling star or get with child a mandrake root" What more can one say. John Donne particularly!

    • Kerry O'Connor says:

      Surely the most innovative group of poets, in the English language, until the Modernists and Post-Modernists of 20th Century.

    • Lucy says:

      I used to love the Metaphysical poets, but much of this collection I found very difficult to understand. Maybe it's an age thing.

    • Martin Bihl says:

      I gotta admit - i love Donne, but reading this was a lot like work. Like eating your oatmeal - good for you, but you'd rather have a beer.

    • Mark Dickman says:

      Donne, Marvell, etc. Among the greatest poets after Shakespeare.

    • Gayle says:

      This was a school book. I still love it and read it often. What is there not to love? Especially Donne.

    • Rozonda says:

      Beautiful collection from own of the most personal lyrical movements any countr ever had.

    • Mandi says:

      Zero Stars. NEW AGE GARBAGE. FIND JESUS <3

    • William Cane says:

      In addition to the terrific selection, there is a very perceptive introduction by Helen Gardner with one of the most enlightening and well-written discussions of the metaphysical conceit.

    • Emma says:

      Did every high school student have to study this? Surely they could have some new ideas by now for poetry to study

    • Mikael says:

      now thats what i call an anthology vol. 1

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