American Pulp: How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street

American Pulp How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street There is real hope for a culture that makes it as easy to buy a book as it does a pack of cigarettes a civic leader quoted in a New American Library ad American Pulp tells the story of the midcen

  • Title: American Pulp: How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street
  • Author: Paula Rabinowitz
  • ISBN: 9780691173382
  • Page: 417
  • Format: Paperback
  • There is real hope for a culture that makes it as easy to buy a book as it does a pack of cigarettes a civic leader quoted in a New American Library ad 1951 American Pulp tells the story of the midcentury golden age of pulp paperbacks and how they brought modernism to Main Street, democratized literature and ideas, spurred social mobility, and helped readers fashion n There is real hope for a culture that makes it as easy to buy a book as it does a pack of cigarettes a civic leader quoted in a New American Library ad 1951 American Pulp tells the story of the midcentury golden age of pulp paperbacks and how they brought modernism to Main Street, democratized literature and ideas, spurred social mobility, and helped readers fashion new identities Drawing on extensive original research, Paula Rabinowitz unearths the far reaching political, social, and aesthetic impact of the pulps between the late 1930s and early 1960s.Published in vast numbers of titles, available everywhere, and sometimes selling in the millions, pulps were throwaway objects accessible to anyone with a quarter Conventionally associated with romance, crime, and science fiction, the pulps in fact came in every genre and subject American Pulp tells how these books ingeniously repackaged highbrow fiction and nonfiction for a mass audience, drawing in readers of every kind with promises of entertainment, enlightenment, and titillation Focusing on important episodes in pulp history, Rabinowitz looks at the wide ranging effects of free paperbacks distributed to World War II servicemen and women how pulps prompted important censorship and First Amendment cases how some gay women read pulp lesbian novels as how to dress manuals the unlikely appearance in pulp science fiction of early representations of the Holocaust how writers and artists appropriated pulp as a literary and visual style and much Examining their often lurid packaging as well as their content, American Pulp is richly illustrated with reproductions of dozens of pulp paperback covers, many in color.A fascinating cultural history, American Pulp will change the way we look at these ephemeral yet enduringly intriguing books.

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      Posted by:Paula Rabinowitz
      Published :2019-08-02T08:01:07+00:00

    359 Comment

    • John says:

      The subject of this book is fascinating.Unfortunately, the book reads like a collection of lectures and is rambling and unfocused. There are bits and pieces of useful information scattered among what amounts to long-winded speeches. The e-book edition (Nook) was also a disappointment. Everything is in black and white, and if one is to get the proper "feel" of what old, original paperbacks looked like, then you need to see them as they were -- in color.I was disappointed in the book, though I wil [...]

    • Quirkyreader says:

      If you love mid 20th century paperbacks, then this book is for you. I have a longer review contained on my bookblog: quirkyreadervejournal/4This is a wonderful book dealing with ephemeral histrory.

    • John Hohn says:

      Ah, the lowly paperback. It has had a powerful impact on American culture. Author Paul Rabinowitz delineates the role it has played since first appearing for sale on American newsstands, drugstores, and coffee shops in the 1930’s. Her book, American Pulp: How Paperbacks Brought Modernism to Main Street, examines the often overlooked influence that the cheap, pocket-sized books had on every phase of American culture.The word pulp usually often connotes prurient, escapist literature featuring un [...]

    • Bookworm says:

      Another academic thesis that should not have become a book. Books about books, reading, bookstores, etc. are always fun for me to read. This sounded like a fantastic read about how the lowly paperback helped democratize information. In light of the recent discussions and arguments about "fake news" and "alternative facts" and other similar ideas the book sounded like this would be especially topical on how information can be distributed to the wider masses. Unfortunately (and perhaps as usual), [...]

    • Chris says:

      "There is real hope for a culture that makes it as easy to buy a book as it does a pack of cigarettes.”—a civic leader quoted in a New American Library ad (1951)"American Pulp makes a persuasive argument for enduring yet overlooked pop artifacts—a physical media declared dead every few months (ironic that I read an ebook version). As a scholarly work it can make for dry or heavy reading, though it’s well-researched and contains a number of book covers and photos to give examples to the r [...]

    • Mandy says:

      This well-researched and detailed exploration of American pulp publishing is both enlightening and thought-provoking. The author examines how the expansion of paperback publishing made a wide range of reading matter available to an increasingly large and varied audience, and although much of it was what we generally understand to be “pulp fiction” some of it was highbrow fiction repackaged to seem accessible to a general readership.This literary and cultural history will be of interest to ma [...]

    • Robert Stewart says:

      I have two problems with this book. The first is that the author claims a more than she can deliver. She seems to mistake correlation with causation. Did pulp paperbacks have a modernizing, de-provincializing influence on American culture? Of course. But so did the mass-market magazines of the first decades of the 20th century, and the pulp magazines that followed, dime novels that preceded both, and most especially, the movies. The second problem is one of style and diction. It's tempting for s [...]

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